Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Runner in the Rye

It's overseeding time in Tucson, which means spending the day grinding the remaining bermuda grass in the backyard down to tiny nubs, raking up the remains, then repeating the task. Since my mower is one of those ancient, push-powered numbers, I can't get the grass down low enough so I end up using a weedwacker. Just to make things more difficult, this year I've decided to pull up and remove several pieces of flagstone that serve as pathways across the grass. With two small children frequenting this area I'v taken to calling these large, heavy, decorative steps "skull-crackers". This activity left me pretty weak for the rest of the day, though my resolve was tested further when I was forced to wrestle 7 bags of "topper" soil from the Home Depot isle into the back of the car. There they stayed until this morning, where in my oxygen deprived, post-run state I finally summoned the courage to drag them all out to the backyard for more fun this evening.

When I was doing triathlons I actually had arm muscles, but after only running and cycling they now they look like elongated, anemic T-Rex arms, dangling uselessly from my frame.

I'm spreading this reseeding chore over a few days, as I have a tendency to overdo things and cripple myself for days by doing too much in too short a timeframe. I don't want to blow 11 weeks of good training by straining a hamstring while lifting a stinky bag of manure.

Yesterday's fun in the yard left me feeling a bit tired this morning, and I started out at a very slow pace. I've noticed since I've stopped obsessing over average paces during the hill phase that my runs are often turning into progression runs without any real effort towards that end. 7:30's become 7:15's, and after halfway I found myself still speeding up. I hit my favorite neighborhood at 9 miles and decided to do the long loop for 12 miles instead of the planned 10. By the time I was finished I was edging up on marathon pace, which surprised me considering how I'd felt 80 minutes ago. Good run.

Training: 12 miles, 1:19:51, 6:39 pace

7 comments:

tb1 said...

Mike,
Lydiard training sounds like it is now becoming a part of you; your lifestyle. Just like exercize itself. I try to explain this concept to people with weight problems. I ususally don't even get a response. Exercise hurts. Lydiard training hurts more. That's why there are so few of Mike and so many fatties. Good luck with your winter lawn.

angie's pink fuzzy said...

and now I understand the text I received last night

"Hell=home depot"

:)

fartleker said...

"When I was doing triathlons I actually had arm muscles, but after only running and cycling they now they look like elongated, anemic T-Rex arms, dangling uselessly from my frame."

To me, that is something to be VERY proud of. See you at the run tomorrow evening.

Mark said...

lawn talk - - that's what I like to see :-)

Anonymous said...

Wow - so does all that work count as cross-training. Sounds like it to me!

Blaxabbath said...

You wouldn't be talking smack about T-Rex's if they were still around.

Greg said...

"When I was doing triathlons I actually had arm muscles, but after only running and cycling they now they look like elongated, anemic T-Rex arms, dangling uselessly from my frame."

I love it when you paint a picture. You're doing a great job with this cycle. Things look good for a breakthrough in December.